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WHAT'S THE BIG DEAL?

What's the Big Deal?
Anyone within the 'path of totality' for Monday's solar eclipse will experience what NASA refers to as one of nature's "most awe-inspiring sights."
The moon will pass between the sun and the earth for up to three hours, from beginning to end, according to NASA. The longest period when the moon completely covers the sun is two minutes and 40 seconds and can be experienced at 1:20 p.m.
The moon will completely cover the sun. You will instead see the upper atmosphere of the sun which looks like a halo around the sun. It's known as the corona.
Who can see it? According to NASA, everyone in North America plus parts of South America, Africa and Europe will see at least a partial total eclipse.
The last total solar eclipse viewed from contiguous United States was on Feb. 26, 1979; its path passed through the northwestern U.S. states of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, and Canadian provinces of Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec.
Do you remember your last school "eclipse" experience? If so, what was it like?
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